Retreat!

Battle of Prairie Grove

The battle in December 1862 secured Northwest Arkansas for the Union. The battlefield is now a state park, and a cultural focal point for people who live in and around Prairie Grove today. A reenactment is held every two years.

View of Herron's Attack

View of Herron's Attack

View from the Confederate position on the morning of December 7, 1862. U.S. General F.J. Herron advanced his troops to the ridge to begin the Battle of Prairie Grove.

Alex with Civil War Cannon.

Alex with Civil War Cannon.

Alex with a Civil War cannon at the Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park. The battle was the late major engagement of the war in Northwest Arkansas.

Sorghum Mill

Sorghum Mill

The Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park includes several historic buildings from Northwest Arkansas.

Moving the Cannons

Moving the Cannons

The C.S.A. artillery was placed into position on the hills near the Borden House.

I guess they conscript them pretty young

I guess they conscript them pretty young

One of the younger reenactors, waiting in front of the Borden House.

Getting into Formation

Getting into Formation

The Confederates had about 11,000 forces engaged in the battle, the Union about 9,000.

Confederate Cavalry Advances

Confederate Cavalry Advances

The reenactors began the battle by sending Confederate Cavalry through the woods and down the hill to meet Union troops below.

Union Artillery Fires

Union Artillery Fires

The Union Artilerry was stationed down the hill and across the field.

The Yankees are Coming!

The Yankees are Coming!

Two of Brig. Gen. Herron's regiments approached the hill as gunpowder filled the air.

Retreat!

Retreat!

Herron's men chased the Confederates up the hill and back to the Borden House.

The Counterattack

The Counterattack

Brig. Gens. John S. Marmaduke and Francis A. Shoup sent their men in a vicious counterattack against the U.S. troops.

The Official Photographers

The Official Photographers

This reenactor built a replica daguerreotype camera to take to the battlefield.

Union Casualties

Union Casualties

About half of the attacking U.S. soldiers were hurt or killed within minutes of the attack. There were about 2,500 casualties on both sides in the battle.

Union Cavalry

Union Cavalry

Our Union Dead

Our Union Dead

175 Union soldiers lost their lives in the battle. They are buried at Fayetteville National Cemetery.

Union Cavalry

Union Cavalry

Union Cavalry

Union Cavalry

Union Retreat

Union Retreat

After another round of attacks and counterattacks, the Union was forced back down the hill.

Fighting Ends

Fighting Ends

The fighting on December 7 ended in a stalemate. However, the Union could call in reinforcements and the Confederacy could not - forcing the rebels to withdraw to Van Buren.

The Confederate Dead

The Confederate Dead

164 Confederates lost their lives in the war. They are buried in the Confederate Cemetery in Fayetteville.