Foggy Morning in Van Winkle Hollow

Van Winkle Hollow

Van Winkle Hollow is a haunting place, in Hobbs State Park not far from War Eagle. Once the busiest saw mill in the area, it's now a series of abandoned ruins being reclaimed by the land.

Foggy Morning in Van Winkle Hollow

Foggy Morning in Van Winkle Hollow

This is the site of an old Confederate mill.

Confederate Ruins

Confederate Ruins

The ruins of this limestone springhouse is virtually at that remains of the Van Winkle family's home and mill.

Foggy Morning - Vertical

Foggy Morning - Vertical

A very foggy Monday morning. You couldn't see much of a sunrise.

Sunrise at Van Winkle's Mill

Sunrise at Van Winkle's Mill

Peter Van Winkle's slaves built a lumber mill here on Little Clifty Creek. He supplied lumber for the Confederates, and sheltered them after they were defeated at Pea Ridge in 1862.

Former Antebellum Mill Site

Former Antebellum Mill Site

The mill was burned down in 1863, after Van Winkle and his family fled to Texas. He built a new mill after the war, but it closed in 1890.

Bridge leading to Van Winkle Hollow

Bridge leading to Van Winkle Hollow

The Van Winkle Hollow was the locus of what what more than 17,000 acres owned by Peter Van Winkle in Northwest Arkansas.

Antebellum Mill; Modern Sunken Forest

Antebellum Mill; Modern Sunken Forest

You can see a photo of the Van Winkle Mill at http://www.friendsofhobbs.com/content/history-park

Trees in Little Clifty Creek

Trees in Little Clifty Creek

I went to the creek the morning after a heavy rain. But these trees were still under some water when I returned a week of no rain.

Little Clifty Creek

Little Clifty Creek

Sunrise on Little Clifty Creek.

Small Footbridge in Van Winkle Hollow

Small Footbridge in Van Winkle Hollow

The bridge is usually unnecessarily, unless it has recently rained.

Trees on Little Clifty Creek

Trees on Little Clifty Creek

Even after a log period without rain, the bottom of the trees were covered in water at the northeast corner of the hollow, where the old mill stood.

Foundation of Lumber Mill

Foundation of Lumber Mill

This is the foundaiton of the Van Winkle lumber mill. It was the first steam-powered sawmill in Northwest Arkansas

Van Winkle's Old Sawmill

Van Winkle's Old Sawmill

The sawmill once provided the lumber for buildings across Northwest Arkansas, including Fayetteville and Eureka Springs. Read more about the mill from the City of Rogers.

Ruins of a Garden

Ruins of a Garden

What remains of a garden maintained by Van Winkle's slaves. In 1861, tax records show Van Winkle had 12 slaves forced to work on his properties in Benton County across more than 1,300 acres.

Garden Steps

Garden Steps

It's hard to believe this raised plateau was once a well-kept garden. Compare this photo with the one showing how the garden looked in its heyday on page 116 of The Landscape of Van Winkle's Mill: Identity, Myth, and Modernity in the Ozark Upland South.

Van Winkle Hollow

Van Winkle Hollow

There have long been local stories of a slave cemetery somewhere in the Hollow. http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1663&context=adan